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  • 1823 Fire of Sant Paul's Basilica

    In the spring of 1823, the curate of St Paul outside the Walls pointed out that the construction of a large iron bracket to supporting some of the main beams of the roof that risked collapsing could no be extended longer, as well in the roof of the basilica there were still water infiltrations during the rains ...

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  • Mazzamurelli Alley

    In the Trastevere district there is a narrow and short road that you meet by turning the corner after the Church of San Crisogono, closed by the walls of two tall buildings, allows you to reach the small eighteenth-century Church of San Gallicano at the bottom; Mazzamurelli have always lived in this place so much that they have the honor of a street with their name: they are capricious spirits of the houses elves ...

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  • Insula Sertoriana (praedia Auria Cyriacetis)

    The insulae were the collective dwellings of ancient Rome and could be identified with the name of their owners, as well as for the Insula Volusiana which took its name from da Lucius Volusius Saurninus; the insula had been built in the Forum Boarium and had one of the sides on one of the vicus where the triumphal processions passed ...

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  • Asaratos Oikos

    From Pliny the Elder we know the name of the artist to whom we owe the invention of two themes that were a model for the artists of Greek, and later Roman, mosaic art: Sosos of Pergamum lived in the second century. B.C. When Sosos was commissioned to create a decoration for the triclinium of the palace of Pergamum, he chose two themes that then became iconographic themes for the art of the ancient world: the doves drinking but , above all, the un-swept dining room or asaratos oikos ...

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  • Via Mario de’ Fiori

    There is a narrow road that, parallel to "Via del Corso", takes us back to Rome in the eighteenth century and the atmosphere that reigns in it refers to aesthetic pleasures from which the name of the character to whom it is entitled is not exempt: "Marius , Pictor Romanus, vulgo Mario de 'Fiori ", or Mario de' Fiori, the eighteenth century painter who loved to paint flowers ...

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  • The most popular arguments
  • The Prisons of Ancient Rome

    In ancient Rome, the prison was not a penalty in itself, but served to guard the guilty of a crime awaiting lawsuit and sentenced to capital punishment or other corporal punishment according to the "ius talioni", the law of retaliation. In the Republican age the sentences were carried out immediately, then during the empire the sentences began to be less rigid and the more complicated procedures for which it happened that a lot of time passed between the sentence and the execution ...

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  • The Hercules and Cacus myth

    The Hercules and Cacus myth expresses the progressive insertion of the Hellenistic culture on the primordial Italic cultures: Hercules is the ...

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  • Aurelia Cotta - The mother of Julius Caesar

    She was born in Rome on May 21, 120 BC, daughter of Lucius Aurelius Cotta who was consul in the year after hers birth; the mother was called Rutilia and even her family was of consular rank. The gens Aurelia had cognomina Cotta, Scaurus, and Orestes and, in the first century, a branch was called Fulvus, to this belonged Titus Aurelius Fulvus who became emperor under the name of Antoninus Pius ...

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  • Julius Caesar’s funeral

    Caesar assassination’s was on 44 B.C. at Ides of March (March 15) in the Curia of Pompey in the Campus Martius, was killed with 23 stab wounds; on the eve ...

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  • Gifts and notes in ancient Rome

    The emperor Vespasian at parties for Martiae Kalendae used to distribute to the women gifts accompanied by notes that were called apophoreta and probably the poet commissioned was Martial, Flavian cliens of long time , which has even left a collection with that name ...

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  • Temple of Janus

    Nothing remains of the Temple of Janus of which we only have a representation on the back of a Nero coin. It was located not far from the Forum ...

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  • Statilia Messalina

    She was the third wife of Nero: Statilia was born in Rome in 35 BC, she was descended from Tito Statilius Taurus who had built Statilius Theatre in ...

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  • The Battle of Cremera - 478 BC

    Livy reminds on July 18, 478 BC as the dies Cremerensis, the day of the Battle of Cremera; It was one of the bitterest defeats to Roma who had to lose all ...

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  • The treasure of Baia

    In 1954 during excavation work to bring to light the ancient Baiae, in a room of the Baths of Sosandra were found many fragments of gypsum that you thought were the "forms" that the stone cutters and smelters used to make the statues with which buildings were decorated ...

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  • The secret name of Roman women

    In ancient Rome, a own woman's name had to remain secret, in fact, while men have their name, then the name of the gens and finally the cognomen, women are always written as the name of the gens to which they belong - that often induces errors in historical treatises - and are distinguished with maior or minor based on the seniority or by an ordinal number, secunda, tertia ...

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