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  • Augustalia

    In 19 BC Augustus concluded a treaty with the Parties that allowed him to bring the kingdoms that were west of the Euphrates, including Judea, under the control of Rome as well as strengthening relations with others were already clientes as Cilicia, Commagene, Nabatea, Itturea and Emesa ...

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  • Porticus of Consentes Dii

    The Porticus Deorum Consentium was a sanctuary whose construction seems to date back to the IV-III century. B.C. and it was a building where a lectisternium took place, a ritual that consisted of a public banquet in which foods were offered to the gods represented by their statues. The rite was of Greek origin and involved six couples of gods who were offered a ritual banquet. The offer to several deities at the same time was not new in Roman religion which already had the triads formed by Jupiter-Juno-Minerva, of Etruscan origin, and Ceres-Liber-Libera derived from archaic agrarian cults to which ritual libations were offered ...

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  • Flooding of the Tiber

    Livy narrates that in 189 BC the Tiber flooded Campus Martius twelve times, but the event was exceptional only in the number of episodes while it was normal for the Tiber to come out of its riverbed. The floods of the Tiber were a normal fact for Rome, as is also evidenced by the legend that places the flood of the river at the origin of its foundation transporting the basket of the twins Romulus and Remus and making it aground in the reeds in front of the Lupercal ...

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  • Telesina and her ten husbands

    Martial says that from the third century. B.C. Roman women could easily divorce and remarry so much that he reports the case of a matron named Telesina who in thirty days managed to get married 10 times ...

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  • 1084 Sack of the Normans

    During the period of clashes between the Papacy and the Empire, the battles involved Rome several times; the militias that supported the emperors had taken the city and appointed an antipope and to put things right the pope called Robert the Guiscard whose army made up of Normans and mercenaries set the city on fire; there was a fire that lasted three days and destroyed everything there was between the Lateran and Campus Martius ...

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  • The most popular arguments
  • The Prisons of Ancient Rome

    In ancient Rome, the prison was not a penalty in itself, but served to guard the guilty of a crime awaiting lawsuit and sentenced to capital punishment or other corporal punishment according to the "ius talioni", the law of retaliation. In the Republican age the sentences were carried out immediately, then during the empire the sentences began to be less rigid and the more complicated procedures for which it happened that a lot of time passed between the sentence and the execution ...

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  • Aurelia Cotta - The mother of Julius Caesar

    She was born in Rome on May 21, 120 BC, daughter of Lucius Aurelius Cotta who was consul in the year after hers birth; the mother was called Rutilia and even her family was of consular rank. The gens Aurelia had cognomina Cotta, Scaurus, and Orestes and, in the first century, a branch was called Fulvus, to this belonged Titus Aurelius Fulvus who became emperor under the name of Antoninus Pius ...

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  • The Hercules and Cacus myth

    The Hercules and Cacus myth expresses the progressive insertion of the Hellenistic culture on the primordial Italic cultures: Hercules is the ...

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  • Temple of Hercules Olivarius

    The temple is the oldest still existing marble building in Rome and dates back to 120 B.C.; is located in the ancient Forum Boarium area where there was ...

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  • Julius Caesar’s funeral

    Caesar assassination’s was on 44 B.C. at Ides of March (March 15) in the Curia of Pompey in the Campus Martius, was killed with 23 stab wounds; on the eve ...

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  • Flooding of the Tiber

    Livy narrates that in 189 BC the Tiber flooded Campus Martius twelve times, but the event was exceptional only in the number of episodes while it was normal for the Tiber to come out of its riverbed. The floods of the Tiber were a normal fact for Rome, as is also evidenced by the legend that places the flood of the river at the origin of its foundation transporting the basket of the twins Romulus and Remus and making it aground in the reeds in front of the Lupercal ...

    Continue »


  • Telesina and her ten husbands

    Martial says that from the third century. B.C. Roman women could easily divorce and remarry so much that he reports the case of a matron named Telesina who in thirty days managed to get married 10 times ...

    Continue »


  • Discovery Historia of Seneca in a papyrus of Herculaneum

    A new technology and the expertise and patience of Valeria Piano have given back to the world an important text by Anneo Seneca the Elder: "Historiae ab initio bellorum civileum", a historical work related to events from the period of civil wars to Emperor Tiberius, probably the last work written by the historian who died in 37 AD; until today expected the work lost instead it was hidden among the charred papyri in the library of the Pisons Villa in Herculaneum ...

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  • Porticus of Consentes Dii

    The Porticus Deorum Consentium was a sanctuary whose construction seems to date back to the IV-III century. B.C. and it was a building where a lectisternium took place, a ritual that consisted of a public banquet in which foods were offered to the gods represented by their statues. The rite was of Greek origin and involved six couples of gods who were offered a ritual banquet. The offer to several deities at the same time was not new in Roman religion which already had the triads formed by Jupiter-Juno-Minerva, of Etruscan origin, and Ceres-Liber-Libera derived from archaic agrarian cults to which ritual libations were offered ...

    Continue »


  • Theatre of Marcellus

    Theatre of Marcellus is perhaps the most ancient theater of which even today's architecture is visible; its construction was begun by Caesar, but ...

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