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  • The Rotunda by the sea of Ostia

    At the end of the eighteenth century in Brighton, the favorite holiday resort of the English nobility, a therapeutic center was built which, to exploit the benefits of the marine environment, had the particularity of being built in the water with a long walkway that connected it to the mainland. This type of establishment soon spread throughout Europe. The first example of Rotunda in Italy can be considered the one designed in 1782 by Vanvitelli, a stilt house in Monte di Procida on Lake of Fusaro ...

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  • Wood of Anna Perenna at Park of Music

    From early Republican era at the first mile of the Via Flaminia was the wood consecrated to Anna Perenna. Outside the Flaminia gate there were large farms and then springs of clear water and valleys and woods; these woods were not very frequented habitually and often there were going on mysterious rituals also . Here was the wood of Anna Perenna, the goddess of nature and the renewal of the seasons ...

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  • Caligula and the mystery cults

    Gaius, called Caligula, was the third son of Germanicus and Agrippina the Elder, during his imperium he had unacceptable behavior for Roman morals and incomprehensible even for those who followed him above all out of fear; this behavior was imputed to the observance of mystery cults or to madness, but it is possible that there is another interpretation ...

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  • Turris Chartularia

    In the Middle Ages, during the struggles for power, the noble families of Rome had built fortresses by choosing sites at the top and using the existing buildings as much as possible. The Frangipane family, perhaps a branch of the gens Anicia, was one of the most powerful in Rome and its surname derived from an ancestor, merchant by profession, who during a famine in the eighth century turned Rome distributing bread (fragnere panem = breaking bread ) to people suffering from hunger. In the twelfth century the famiy was divided into three branches, one of which had settled in Trastevere, another controlled the area of the Circus Maximus and the south-east of the Palatine where had fortified the Septizonium and had added a tower that still can be seen in the short side of the Circus Maximus, and called in the Middle Ages Turris in Capite Circi (but better known as Torre della Moletta for the small mill that stood next to it when the Fosso di S. Giovanni still flowed in the valley); finally another settled in the saddle between Palatine and Velia and surrounded the whole Roman Forum with walls, incorporating the Arch of Titus which became a gate but on which it was also built in elevation to have a tower ...

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  • Ludus Matutinus

    When the Colosseum was inaugurated in A.D. 80, the emperor Titus celebrating 100 days of games that the historian Dio Cassius called really great because the marvel was not only the many gladiator fights, but the great representations of naval battles and hunts ...

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  • The most popular arguments
  • Aurelia Cotta - The mother of Julius Caesar

    She was born in Rome on May 21, 120 BC, daughter of Lucius Aurelius Cotta who was consul in the year after hers birth; the mother was called Rutilia and even her family was of consular rank. The gens Aurelia had cognomina Cotta, Scaurus, and Orestes and, in the first century, a branch was called Fulvus, to this belonged Titus Aurelius Fulvus who became emperor under the name of Antoninus Pius ...

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  • Arch of Titus

    The Arch of Titus is one of two arches of the Roman Forum still intact. The other is the Arch of Septimius Severus that with the Arch of Constantine near the Colosseum and the Arch of Gallienus in Esquiline are the triumphal arches still visible and substantially intact in Rome ...

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  • Discovery Historia of Seneca in a papyrus of Herculaneum

    A new technology and the expertise and patience of Valeria Piano have given back to the world an important text by Anneo Seneca the Elder: "Historiae ab initio bellorum civileum", a historical work related to events from the period of civil wars to Emperor Tiberius, probably the last work written by the historian who died in 37 AD; until today expected the work lost instead it was hidden among the charred papyri in the library of the Pisons Villa in Herculaneum ...

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  • The Prisons of Ancient Rome

    In ancient Rome, the prison was not a penalty in itself, but served to guard the guilty of a crime awaiting lawsuit and sentenced to capital punishment or other corporal punishment according to the "ius talioni", the law of retaliation. In the Republican age the sentences were carried out immediately, then during the empire the sentences began to be less rigid and the more complicated procedures for which it happened that a lot of time passed between the sentence and the execution ...

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  • The Hercules and Cacus myth

    The Hercules and Cacus myth expresses the progressive insertion of the Hellenistic culture on the primordial Italic cultures: Hercules is the ...

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  • Theatre of Marcellus

    Theatre of Marcellus is perhaps the most ancient theater of which even today's architecture is visible; its construction was begun by Caesar, but ...

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  • Lucius Junius Brutus

    He was the founder of the Roman Republic and who led the revolt of the people and the Senate of Rome against the Tarquini and, after their expulsion ...

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  • Julius Caesar’s funeral

    Caesar assassination’s was on 44 B.C. at Ides of March (March 15) in the Curia of Pompey in the Campus Martius, was killed with 23 stab wounds; on the eve ...

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  • Pompeii: new fresco with Leda and the swan

    In Pompeii, another marvelous discovery was made during the excavations in the Regio V in a domus located along the road in the direction of Porta Vesuvio where, removing the layers of ash, a cubiculum frescoed wall appeared with a depicting of Leda and the Swan myth ...

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  • Turris Chartularia

    In the Middle Ages, during the struggles for power, the noble families of Rome had built fortresses by choosing sites at the top and using the existing buildings as much as possible. The Frangipane family, perhaps a branch of the gens Anicia, was one of the most powerful in Rome and its surname derived from an ancestor, merchant by profession, who during a famine in the eighth century turned Rome distributing bread (fragnere panem = breaking bread ) to people suffering from hunger. In the twelfth century the famiy was divided into three branches, one of which had settled in Trastevere, another controlled the area of the Circus Maximus and the south-east of the Palatine where had fortified the Septizonium and had added a tower that still can be seen in the short side of the Circus Maximus, and called in the Middle Ages Turris in Capite Circi (but better known as Torre della Moletta for the small mill that stood next to it when the Fosso di S. Giovanni still flowed in the valley); finally another settled in the saddle between Palatine and Velia and surrounded the whole Roman Forum with walls, incorporating the Arch of Titus which became a gate but on which it was also built in elevation to have a tower ...

    Continue »


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