Login      FOLLOW US ON follow on Facebook follow on Twitter follow on Pinterest follow on Tumblr follow on Google Plus
Focus
  • Cannonball Fountain

    On the Pincio hill, right in front of Villa Medici, there is a fountain that despite its structure is essential and not showy embodies art, history and legends perhaps like few others in Rome and would be almost unknown if it weren't linked to an anecdote about Christina, the Queen of Sweden who in the seventeenth century was one of the most eccentric and in sight personalities in Rome ...

    Continue »


  • The golden roses of the Popes

    In the chronicles of the papal court, there is also the list of the expenses of 1736 and among them is recorded: To Michele Carlier Silversmith to account of the price of the Golden Rose 865.00 scudi ...

    Continue »


  • Confarreatio, sacred marriage

    The rite of archaic marriage was called Confarreatio and dated back to the time of the monarchy; its name derived from the spelled focaccia (panis farreus) that the spouses parted to symbolize the future life together that they dedicated to Juppiter Farreus. In the Republican age it became the sacred marriage reserved only for the Flamines Maiores and the Pontifex Maximum and for the patricians who could have access to those offices ...

    Continue »


  • Triclinium Leoninum

    At the end of the sixteenth century, when the Pope already lived in the Palaces on Vatican Hill, Pope Sixtus V wanted to demolish the previous residence, the Patriarchus Lateran, but he recommended to preserve the apse of the Triclinium for the important meaning that the wall mosaics had for the Roman Church ...

    Continue »


  • 800 AD – Coronation of Charlemagne

    On Christmas Eve of 800 AD, the Holy Roman Empire was born in Rome when, in St. Peter's, Pope Leo III crowned Charlemagne saying: "To Charles Augustus crowned by God, great pacific emperor of the Romans" and the crowd that filled the Basilica burst into exclamations of joy and acclaimed him as supreme prince. This was the act that strengthened the bond between the Franks and the Papacy that already with Adrian Ist had recognized in the frank king the Patricius Romanorum, or the defender of the Church ...

    Continue »


  • The most popular arguments
  • The Hercules and Cacus myth

    The Hercules and Cacus myth expresses the progressive insertion of the Hellenistic culture on the primordial Italic cultures: Hercules is the ...

    Continue »


  • The Prisons of Ancient Rome

    In ancient Rome, the prison was not a penalty in itself, but served to guard the guilty of a crime awaiting lawsuit and sentenced to capital punishment or other corporal punishment according to the "ius talioni", the law of retaliation. In the Republican age the sentences were carried out immediately, then during the empire the sentences began to be less rigid and the more complicated procedures for which it happened that a lot of time passed between the sentence and the execution ...

    Continue »


  • Ancient graffiti. Scripta currente et verba vulgata

    Next to the Latin scholar and "monumental" there existed not only the Latin spoken in the streets but also the one written on the walls, and it may happen that visiting precisely the Roman Forum and the Palatine you can find these ancient graffiti. Scholars call this type of writing cursive capital because it is denoted by the uppercase character of the letters and the ductus (trend) of the writing where the letters are unrelated to each other and disjointed mainly due to the support, the wall or the tablet, which involves the use of the scratch technique, the result of which is what we now call graffiti. To obtain this type of writing it was used the graphium, a kind of burin in various materials sufficiently hard to be able to trace marks on the waxed wooden tablets; it could be about 20-25 cm long and on one side it ended pointy for writing and on the other it was wide and flat to be able to erase ...

    Continue »


  • Confarreatio, sacred marriage

    The rite of archaic marriage was called Confarreatio and dated back to the time of the monarchy; its name derived from the spelled focaccia (panis farreus) that the spouses parted to symbolize the future life together that they dedicated to Juppiter Farreus. In the Republican age it became the sacred marriage reserved only for the Flamines Maiores and the Pontifex Maximum and for the patricians who could have access to those offices ...

    Continue »


  • Julius Caesar’s funeral

    Caesar assassination’s was on 44 B.C. at Ides of March (March 15) in the Curia of Pompey in the Campus Martius, was killed with 23 stab wounds; on the eve ...

    Continue »


  • 800 AD – Coronation of Charlemagne

    On Christmas Eve of 800 AD, the Holy Roman Empire was born in Rome when, in St. Peter's, Pope Leo III crowned Charlemagne saying: "To Charles Augustus crowned by God, great pacific emperor of the Romans" and the crowd that filled the Basilica burst into exclamations of joy and acclaimed him as supreme prince. This was the act that strengthened the bond between the Franks and the Papacy that already with Adrian Ist had recognized in the frank king the Patricius Romanorum, or the defender of the Church ...

    Continue »


  • Aurelia Cotta - The mother of Julius Caesar

    She was born in Rome on May 21, 120 BC, daughter of Lucius Aurelius Cotta who was consul in the year after hers birth; the mother was called Rutilia and even her family was of consular rank. The gens Aurelia had cognomina Cotta, Scaurus, and Orestes and, in the first century, a branch was called Fulvus, to this belonged Titus Aurelius Fulvus who became emperor under the name of Antoninus Pius ...

    Continue »


  • Lucius Junius Brutus

    He was the founder of the Roman Republic and who led the revolt of the people and the Senate of Rome against the Tarquini and, after their expulsion ...

    Continue »


  • Theatre of Marcellus

    Theatre of Marcellus is perhaps the most ancient theater of which even today's architecture is visible; its construction was begun by Caesar, but ...

    Continue »


  • Ustrinum Hadriani

    In the winter of 1867 Lanciani thought he had found the two temples of Dis and Proserpina instead he had found the Ustrinum of Hadrian, the sacred area where the emperor's body had been cremated.
    In Tabula X of the Laws of the Twelve Tables of 490 BC it was written:Do not bury or cremate any dead inside the city. The law required that the tombs be placed outside the sacred enclosure of theUrbs, the Pomoeriium, but the methods of body preservation were free; in the aarchaic age both the inhumation and the cremation were used but, already starting from the first century. B.C. ,the use of cremation in the second century it became a general practice so much that burial was almost the exception. Then ustrina were established, these were sacred areas where the pyres were raised for the bodies cremation ...

    Continue »


Subscribe to newsletter!